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In Micon’s Opinion…

Can I Use Historic Assay Data in My Resource Estimate?

Can I Use Historic Assay Data in My Resource Estimate?

Can use be made of old or historic assay data in a current mineral resource estimate? The amount of data involved may be substantial and duplicating it could cost hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars. Clients usually wants to use as much of it as possible. What can be done to complete best practices data verification and justify its use?

When is a Reserve a Reserve?

When is a Reserve a Reserve?

When is something “economically mineable” for the purpose of reporting a mineral reserve? Beyond requiring the use of certain reporting codes, NI 43-101 does not specify a methodology for the estimation of mineral resources or reserves.

Geostatistics: Black Box Magic or Skilled Procedure?

Geostatistics: Black Box Magic or Skilled Procedure?

Geostatistics is more than just a black-box or button-pushing exercise. It is a process involving a suitable collection of data and geological information, a detailed analysis of this data, an understanding of suitable methods for estimation and their inherent assumptions, and a systematic and comprehensive validation of the output model. Tools such as software packages are not magic wands that mysteriously produce models that fit the characteristics of the natural phenomenon. A sensible geostatistical estimate takes time, understanding, experience and skill to produce.

Due Diligence Reports – an IE’s Perspective

Due Diligence Reports – an IE’s Perspective

The mining consultant, or Independent Engineer (‘IE’) can provide the expertise needed to assess the full range of technical risks and opportunities associated with mining projects. on behalf of the potential investor.

Cut-off Grades for Mineral Resource Reporting

Cut-off Grades for Mineral Resource Reporting

Under the CIM Standards on Mineral Resources and Reserves – Definitions and Guidelines, a mineral resource must be in “such form, grade or quality and quantity that there are reasonable prospects for eventual economic extraction”. The implications of this for the selection of a cut-off grade are discussed in this article by Micon’s V.P. Geology, Terry Hennessey.

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